Remembering Corrie ten Boom

the-hiding-place-by-corrie-ten-boomReading the story of Corrie ten Boom, when I was in high school, was an important moment in my spiritual growth. The Hiding Place, a memoir, tells of Corrie’s life in Holland, and how her Christian family helped the Jews suffering from Nazi persecution. The title refers to both the physical hiding place where the ten Boom family hid the Jews in their home, and also to the line in Psalm 119:114 which says, “Thou art my hiding place and my shield: I hope in thy word… The hiding place in their home was betrayed, and Corrie and her family were taken to the camps. Only she survived, and amazingly she spent the rest of her life traveling the world and talking about forgiveness, hope and freedom.

It was many decades later, in coming to serve at St. John’s, that I met the authors; my dear friends John and Elizabeth Sherrill, whom you meet in this video. They spoke to a group of young actors who are preparing to present a stage version of The Hiding Place, at the Company Theatre in Norwell, MA. You will see several material reminders of that terrible time, including a yellow star and a flower that Corrie embroidered on her undershirt, using thread she unraveled from her clothes and a smuggled needle.

On this day, when we officially remember the Holocaust–or more appropriately the Shoah (calamity)–I am proud to share this evidence that the terrible lessons of that time are being remembered and taught to our children.

Blessings,
Anne+

The embedded link wasn’t working, so please click on the link below to see the video on YouTube.

[http://youtu.be/59o2luUjP8M]

A Dangerous Week

“His blood be on us and on our children!” “Crucify him!” 

For hundreds of years, Holy Week has been a dangerous time to be a Jew.  The language of the Passion narrative is shocking.  This text has had the disastrous result of inspiring anti-Jewish prejudice and violence when the words were read at face value, and not as 1st century rhetoric. We continue to stand under the shadow of the Holocaust—better named the Shoah (calamity)—which was the institutionalized murder of six million Jews during World War II.  And Jesus wept. We cannot allow this toxic misreading to continue.

Crucifix of San Damiano

Crucifix of San Damiano

Know this: Jesus was a Jew. His followers were mostly Jews. The people he preached to, taught and healed, were mostly Jews. He taught in the Jewish Synagogues from the Jewish Scriptures. He was executed by the Romans. As Christianity formed, and separated from the Jewish community, there were struggles and persecutions which influenced the tone and language of the Gospels, and allowed anachronistic transfer of blame from the Romans to the Jews.  The fact is that only the Roman government could execute a person, and those crucified were considered enemies of the state.The Gospels tell the Passion story in grief and anger.  We hear disturbing words this week from our Holy Scriptures; we hear the awful cost of Jesus’ sacrifice.  It is a hard journey. We must not make it easier on ourselves by feeding the hostility that continues to exist against our Jewish brothers and sisters. Anti-Jewish violence and prejudice is intolerable.

When we reach the Sunday of the Resurrection, Christians rejoice in Jesus Christ’s triumph over the power of evil and death.  Remember who we follow and what he taught.  It is clear that Christians are never to be agents of evil and death in his name, and we must take care not to be casually or silently complicit in perpetuating prejudice against Jews in our churches and among our children.  Remember his answer to the question about which was the greatest commandment:

You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest and first commandment. And a second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets. (Matt. 22:37-40)

We are called to love our neighbor, and our closest neighbors are members of the Jewish faith.  We must not force the Jews to lock their doors for fear of the Christians.

Blessings,

Anne+